Internet of Everything: Does it make sense? Not for you, but for other perhaps

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We are at the dawn of a new technology era where objects are connected to the Internet. It is true that the possibilities are huge for new products or services. At Carriots we believe that we are the beginning phase of this era where:

  • A lot of Start-ups are sprouting in the Internet of Things business
  • You can find the first IOT products for B2B and B2C
  • Investors are very interested in the concept and willing to finance projects
  • Early adopters start to implement the technology and buy the products
  • Tech media starts to publish a lot of material and mass media talks about it sometimes
  • Big Companies embrace the IOT concept in their Marketing Strategy

As a result we begin to see hype growing rapidly every month, as more people and companies jump in. The question is: Are we inflating expectations and uses of Internet of Things?

A few years back, the consulting firm Gartner developed the theory of the Hype Cycle to help their customers manage expectations and make a reasonable use of technologies. They converted the different phases of maturity, adoption and social application into this great graph:

The Hype Cycle from Gartner
Source: Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hype-Cycle-General.png

Although this theory has detractors, we think it is a nice tool to help you think about the present and future of IOT.

So when we see big companies like Cisco endorsing the concept of Internet of Everything we might think that “Everything” is perhaps over hyping expectations too much. What do you think?

Now let’s play a game together to forecast the future. If you think of a kitchen and Internet of Things what products come to your mind?

  • A connected fridge that purchases groceries for you and helps you cooking? We have seen plenty of these products already available. Would somebody buy this product? Well… Is there a real benefit for the user? Not quite yet. Would all the fridges connected to the Internet in the future? Not so sure. The Carriots team is full of geeks that prefer traditional refrigerators.

Example of Refrigerator connected to the Internet to get recipes and Tweet

  • What about a connected Toaster? Well that we are sure that there is no future for such a gadget. 0 votes here for tweeting when breakfast is ready.

A simple toaster. No need to tweet

  • So what about your coffee machine? Wait a moment here! Well for you it might not be interesting to connect your coffee machine to the Internet. But for the manufacturer of the machine it might be interesting. In fact a lot! Some companies like Nespresso already implement M2M technology in some products for B2B. Well that’s B2B and your coffee machine is B2C so what is the point? For the manufacturer of your capsule coffee machine it might be very interesting to know what brand of capsules you purchase. In fact it is no so difficult to know which is the manufacturer if they use different materials like aluminium and plastic. Lots of manufacturers already detect if you use original replacement parts or not in their products, take for example printers. A company that follows a “Razorblade” business model depends on loyalty to the replacement product and IOT technology might be a excellent tool to many of business processes envolved.

So when we talk about Internet of Everything we are taking the concept too far. But if for you the concept of a connected product is not interesting, perhaps there is another party interested in it. A product that you use can provide very useful information to the manufacturer, the supplier or replacement parts or even market analysis firms, to name a few.

So as the cost of this technology drops and more uses can be found, we will come close to the Internet of almost Everything.

Internet of Everything: Does it make sense? Not for you, but for other perhaps.

We are at the dawn of a new technology era where objects are connected to the Internet. It is true that the possibilities are huge for new products or services. At Carriots we believe that we are the beginning phase of this era where:

• A lot of Start-ups are sprouting in the Internet of Things business

• You can find the first IOT products for B2B and B2C

• Investors are very interested in the concept and willing to finance projects.

• Early adopters start to implement the technology and buy the products

• Tech media starts to publish a lot of material and mass media talks about it sometimes

• Big Companies embrace the IOT concept in their Marketing Strategy

As a result we begin to see hype growing rapidly every month, as more people and companies jump in. The question is: Are we inflating expectations and uses of Internet of Things?

A few years back, the consulting firm Gartner www.gartner.com developed the theory of the Hype Cycle http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hype_cycle to help their customers manage expectations and make a reasonable use of technologies. They converted the different phases of maturity, adoption and social application into this great graph:

Image 1 ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hype-Cycle-General.png

)

Although this theory has detractors, we think it is a nice tool to help you think.

So when we see big companies like Cisco endorsing the concept of Internet of Everything https://www.cisco.com/web/tomorrow-starts-here/ioe/index.html we might think that “Everything” is perhaps over hyping expectations too much. What do you think?

Now let’s play a game together to forecast the future. If you think of a kitchen and Internet of Things what products come to your mind?

• A connected fridge that purchases groceries for you and helps you cooking? We have seen plenty of the products already (https://revoseek.com/technology/internet-connected-social-refrigerator-to-read-recipes-and-tweet/ ) Imagen https://revoseek.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Internet-Connected-Social-Refrigerator-to-Read-Recipes-and-Tweet-1.jpg Would somebody buy this product ? Well… Is there a real benefit for the user? Not quite yet. Would all the fridges connected to the Internet in the future? Not so sure. The Carriots team is full of geeks that prefer traditional refrigerators .

• What about a connected Toaster? Image https://www.ohgizmo.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/kenwood_toaster.jpg Well that we are sure that there is no future for such a gadget. 0 votes here for tweeting when breakfast is ready.

• So what about your coffee machine? Wait a moment here! Well for you it might not be interesting to connect your coffee machine to the Internet. But for the manufacturer of the machine it might be interesting. In fact a lot! Some companies like Nespresso already implement M2M technology in some products for B2B https://embedded-m2m-solutions.tmcnet.com/topics/embedded-m2m-solutions/articles/269278-nespresso-leverages-oranges-machine-to-machine-solution-enhance.htm . Well that’s B2B and your coffee machine is B2C so what is the point? For the manufacturer of your capsule coffee machine it might be very interesting to know what brand of capsules you purchase. In fact it is no so difficult to know which is the manufacturer if they use different materials like aluminium and plastic. Lots of manufacturers already detect if you use original replacement parts or not in their products, take for example printers. A company that follows a “Razorblade” business model ( https://www.investopedia.com/terms/r/razor-razorblademodel.asp ) depends on loyalty to the replacement product and IOT technology might be a excellent tool to many of business processes envolved.

So when we talk about Internet of Everything we are taking the concept too far. But if for you the concept of a connected product is not interesting, perhaps there is another party interested in it. A product that you use can provide very useful information to the manufacturer, the supplier or replacement parts or even market analysis firms, to name a few.

So as the cost of this technology drops and more uses can be found, we will come close to the Internet of almost Everything.

Alvaro Everlet

Mr. Everlet is an experienced manager and business oriented technical solution provider. His skills help companies successfully build Internet of Things Solutions that meet both their technical and business goals providing: business modelling, competitive analysis, technology framework definition and implantation, action plans, engineering supervision ending with marketing and sales assessment. Lecturer at IE International Business School.

Mr. Everlet earned his Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from The Polytechnic University of Madrid and King Juan Carlos University. Holds also a Master in Business Administration from the Business Management School (EAE) of Madrid.
Alvaro Everlet

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Alvaro Everlet

About Alvaro Everlet

Mr. Everlet is an experienced manager and business oriented technical solution provider. His skills help companies successfully build Internet of Things Solutions that meet both their technical and business goals providing: business modelling, competitive analysis, technology framework definition and implantation, action plans, engineering supervision ending with marketing and sales assessment. Lecturer at IE International Business School. Mr. Everlet earned his Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from The Polytechnic University of Madrid and King Juan Carlos University. Holds also a Master in Business Administration from the Business Management School (EAE) of Madrid.

2 responses to “Internet of Everything: Does it make sense? Not for you, but for other perhaps”

  1. Avatar leakej says:

    Is there a local server image in case of connection failure ?

    • admincarriots admincarriots says:

      Hi Leakej,

      This kind of questions is best to ask them on our developer forum http://forum.carriots.com .
      There is no possibility to have a local server image. The best way is to solve a connection failure is to store the data localy on the device and retry sending the data once the connection is recovered. That works fine for lots of projects we have worked on. Anyway the connection problem should be due to the network not to Carriots availability. We designed Carriots to have and 99,999% uptime.